Pick of the Week: Suki Waterhouse “OMG”

Pick of the Week, "OMG," Suki Waterhouse, WERS 88.9 FM
Graphics by Celia Abbott

By Nora Onanian, Web Services Coordinator

It’s time for someone to update the music section on Suki Waterhouse’s Wikipedia page… The ultra-talented English actress and model is already proving her sophomore album will pack quite the punch — both emotionally and sonically — through the release of her first single of the New Year, “OMG.”

 

ON “OMG,” WATERHOUSE SOUNDS COOL AND COLLECTED… UNTIL SHE ISN’T

Listening to the sound of “OMG” brings to mind the turn that psychedelic-soul group the Marías’ took with their 2021 single “Hush.” Like “Hush,” Waterhouse’s new track pulls a bouncing bass line and prominent percussive elements that would almost steal the show if it weren’t for the allure of her main vocals. 

Rather than contrast being added by a literal second voice (as in the case of the Marías’ Josh Conway coming in for some verses of “Hush”), “OMG” has an explosion of energy each time the chorus comes in, indicative of the realization Waterhouse makes in those specific lyrics. 

In the landscape of Waterhouse’s discography, these peaks in sonic intensity — perhaps better identified as emotional releases — are just one suggestion of why “OMG” marks a new era for Waterhouse. It’s one where she holds nothing back in terms of sound or subject matter.

 

WATERHOUSE’S LYRICISM BRIDGES AUTHENTICITY & APPARITIONS 

Even the most self-assured of people have had moments where they found themselves slipping into a disingenuous version of themselves, especially around certain people they feel drawn to impress. A crucial part of learning and growing comes from recognizing these moments and finding the inner-power to reaffirm personal authenticity.

In “OMG” Suki Waterhouse reflects on a relationship where she learned this lesson the hard way. She uses imagery of the city to show how the memories of losing herself in wanting to make things work with this person now haunt her. In an early verse, she sings, “The city sky is hangin' low, it seems to know, I'm findin' comfort where I can with all these ghosts.” 

While it’s hard not to look for her former partner’s face in the crowded streets, she urges them not to look for hers. She is ultimately able to rest assured, however, finding comfort in the realization that her ex will only ever look for the wrong version of her— the one she made herself out to be while loving them. She sings, “See myself but it’s not me.” 

"OMG" ends with the same plea Waterhouse makes throughout the song, on each striking chorus: “Oh my God, take me back the way that I was.” No matter how tempting this person is or once was, she knows that keeping true to herself is what’s most important.   

 

WHAT’S NEXT FOR SUKI WATERHOUSE?

It's looking like 2024 will be another whirlwind year for Suki Waterhouse, who keeps busy with music, modeling and acting projects, and is also due to have her first child with her partner, Robert Pattinson.

“OMG” is the follow-up to Suki Waterhouse’s 2023 release “To Love,” which is said to be the lead single of her upcoming sophomore album. An official release date and title to the record are unknown for now, but after the success of her debut album I Can’t Let Go, one thing that is for certain is that it will come highly-anticipated. 

 

You can find ways to listen to “OMG” here! Also, be sure to check out the music video where Waterhouse makes an obvious nod to the legendary French popular singer Édith Piaf, who is known for songs like “La Vie en Rose” and “Non, Je Ne Regrette Rien.” Piaf passed away in 1963, but continues to be revered today, including having a small planet named after her posthumously.

 

Every Monday, our music staff brings you a new Pick of The Week, detailing some of our favorite songs. Check out our previous Picks of the Week here, and make sure to tune in to WERS 88.9FM!

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